Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Multi-Quoting

Notes from class: Tess immediately shifts from “Artemis” and “Demeter” in Angel’s eyes, to an “unapprehending peasant”. Tess is shown in the novel’s opening with a “red ribbon in her hair”, and this motif follows her to Trantridge (where she has “full red lips”), to Talbothays (“where her skin has “madder stains”), and finally to the lodging house at Sandbourne, where the Alec’s blood stains … Continue reading Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Multi-Quoting

Tess of the d’Urbervilles – TIQEESQEEC

Notes from class: T              The first event which contributes to the final turning point is when Tess’s father is approached by Parson Tringham. I               Tess’s father is surprised when he is shown his d’Urberville heritage. Q             The Parson says to him, while walking home, “Good night Sir John.” E              It is interesting that Tringham uses the name “Sir”. E              From this, we learn that in … Continue reading Tess of the d’Urbervilles – TIQEESQEEC

Tess of the d’Urbervilles

Tomorrow’s essay question: Answers to questions on prose fiction should address relevantly the central concern(s)/theme(s) of the text(s) and be supported by reference to appropriate techniques of prose fiction such as: characterisation, setting, key incident(s), narrative technique, symbolism, structure, climax ,plot, atmosphere, dialogue, imagery … Choose a novel in which a central character is flawed but remains an admirable figure. Show how the writer makes … Continue reading Tess of the d’Urbervilles

Tess of the d’Urbervilles

Notes from class:   “So each had a private little sun for her soul to bask in; some dream, some affection, some hobby, or at least some remote and distant hope….” All of the girls in Tess’s village are working class, and their dreams are remote to them – unlikely ever to be fulfilled. “I don’t know; but I think so. They sometimes seem to … Continue reading Tess of the d’Urbervilles

An Inspector Calls – Planning

Answers to questions in this part should refer to the text and to such relevant features as characterisation, key scene(s), structure, climax, theme, plot, conflict, setting . . . Choose a play which explores an issue or theme which interests you. By referring to appropriate techniques, explain how this issue or theme is explored.   Introduction “An Inspector Calls”; J.B. Priestley; 1945 A girl has … Continue reading An Inspector Calls – Planning

National 5 – Duffy Questions

Notes from class: Havisham   “Beloved sweetheart bastard” Use of oxymoron Aggressive language of “bastard” catches your attention. The opening is unexpected, revealing the writer’s conflicted feelings.     “I stink and remember” – She cannot move on with her life. “A red balloon bursting” – symbol of celebration has been destroyed. “I stabbed at a wedding cake” – Shows the anger she felt when … Continue reading National 5 – Duffy Questions

Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Sample Essay

The rejection of Tess Durbeyfield by Angel Clare is the turning point of Thomas Hardy’s 1891 novel, “Tess of the d’Urbervilles”. Despite promises of undying love to Tess, Angel is disgusted by Tess’s sexual past, and abandons his new wife in order to travel to Brazil. While this event is central to Hardy’s story, it also reveals key underlying themes such as misogyny and the … Continue reading Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Sample Essay

Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Planning

Notes from class:   Choose a novel or short story in which there is a character who experiences rejection or isolation. With reference to appropriate techniques, explain the rejection or isolation, and discuss how this aspect adds to your appreciation of the text as a whole. 5 point introduction Section 1. Tess experiences rejection by Angel Clare. “You were one woman, you are now another.” … Continue reading Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Planning

Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Introductions

The hypocrisy of Angel Clare is rank, and he bears huge responsibility for the tragic fate of Tess Durbeyfield (“Tess of the d’Urbervilles”, 1891). Hardy’s characterisation of Angel as man who will not be bound by social convention creates hope for happiness in his heroine, but Clare’s cowardly rejection of Tess reveals both the weakness of his character, and also the punishing social conventions of … Continue reading Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Introductions

Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Notes from Class

Title: “Tess of the d’Urbervilles” Name of the author: Thomas Hardy Date: 1891 Gist: A young working class girl’s terrible fate which unfolds after she is raped by an upper class man in Victorian England. Intention: How Tess’s rejection by Angel sheds light on the rest of the novel.   Answers to questions on Prose Fiction should refer to the text and to such relevant … Continue reading Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Notes from Class