Tess of the d’Urbervilles – Aeschylus

Notes from class:

 

“My appointed fate I must endure as best I can, knowing the power of necessity is irresistible.” – Prometheus Bound, Aeschylus

“I suffer the unrelenting savagery of Zeus.” – Prometheus Bound, Aeschylus

“Are there any in all this suffering world who endure what I endure?” – Prometheus Bound, Aeschylus

 

An essay on fate might begin…

 

“My appointed fate I must endure as best I can, knowing the power of necessity is irresistible.” – Prometheus Bound, Aeschylus

Thomas Hardy makes clear in his 1891 novel, “Tess of the d’Urbervilles”, that his protagonist is fated to suffer throughout her life. Like Prometheus, her existence is one of perpetual pain and suffering. From her rape, to the death of her son, to her betrayal by her husband, her life is a chain of despair. By employing symbolism and characterisation, Hardy develops the idea that Tess’s fate was beyond her own control, as this essay will show.